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PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
[Constitution, Article V, Section 12; NDCC Chapter 49-01]

The Public Service Commission was created by the North Dakota State Constitution and currently consists of three members elected to staggered six-year terms. Public Service Commissioners were originally elected to two-year terms until passage of a constitutional amendment in 1926 lengthened the term of office to six years.

The importance of regulation of public utilities and carriers was recognized early in the history of Dakota. An 1875 law passed by the Territorial Legislature made railroads liable for damages in accidents causing fatalities (S. L. 1875, Ch. 54). Later, Dakota Territory established the basis of future regulation of the railroad industry in 1879 by legislation delineating the organization, powers, and duties of railroads operating in the territory (S. L. 1879, Ch. 46). Subsequent railroad legislation expanded on how railroads in the territory might be organized, operated, merged, constructed, and held accountable for accidents and complaints. Sensitive to the growing presence and power of railroads in the territory, the Territorial Legislature created a Board of Railroad Commissioners in 1885 (S. L. 1885, Ch. 126). The Board of Railroad Commissioners consisted of three members appointed by the Governor for two-year terms and was given general regulatory supervision of railroads operating in the territory. Legislation in 1887 broadened the scope of the Board of Railroad Commissioners by making them responsible for supervision of inspection, grading, weighing, and storage of grain and seeds in the territory; licensing and bonding of public warehousemen; and regulation of warehouse financial transactions.

Reflecting the concern over regulation of railroads in the state, the Board of Railroad Commissioners was designated a constitutional office by the Constitutional Convention in 1889. After statehood, the regulatory powers of the Board of Railroad Commissioners dramatically increased over the years, especially the powers to regulate railroads and the grain handling industry. The Board of Railroad Commissioners was authorized in 1890 to appoint a State Weighmaster and a Chief Grain Inspector to supervise and license warehouses in the state. Additional legislation in 1890 allowed the Board of Railroad Commissioners to investigate railroads in alleged violations of state law and to bring legal action against actual violators. Responsibility for regulation of bridges and ferries (1897); investigation of train wrecks (1907); adjustment of railroad freight rates (1911); regulation of the telephone industry, beginning in 1915; and regulation and adjustment of rates charged by public utilities to consumers were also assigned to the Board of Railroad Commissioners. In 1909, The Board of Railroad Commissioners was authorized to appoint agents to the grain terminals in Duluth and Minneapolis to monitor the grain trade to benefit North Dakota grain growers and shippers (S. L. 1909, Ch. 134). Governor John Burke vetoed the bill repealing this law in 1911.

Broad regulatory powers were formally granted to the Board of Railroad Commissioners during the 1919 session (S. L. 1919, Ch. 192) The regulatory jurisdiction of the Commission included common carriers, railroads, street railways, express companies, toll bridges, ferries, steamboats, telegraph and telephone companies, electric companies, packing and cold storage companies, stockyards, and all other public utility corporations. The Commissioners were also empowered to order utility companies to change unfair rates or practices. The chairman of the Board of Railroad Commissioners was designated a member of the State Publications and Printing Commission from 1919-1959. Additional legislation over the years subjected bus systems and taxis to regulation, 1923; required Commission approval and certification of public utility construction, 1927; required licensing and regulation of aircraft and pilots, 1929 (this function was later transferred to the Aeronautics Commission in 1947); required maintenance of a Department of Weights and Measures, 1933; regulation of livestock dealers, 1933-1957; regulation of roving grain buyers, 1937; regulation of agricultural carriers, 1939; established safety requirements for public utilities, 1969; and licensed auctioneers, 1975.

Reflecting the wide regulatory authority of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, the agency was renamed the Public Service Commission in 1941. With the advent of concentrated energy development in the state, the Public Service Commission assumed responsibility for regulation of various areas of the energy industry, including coal, gas, oil, and water pipelines, 1963; gas distribution systems, strip mining, and land reclamation, 1973; siting and construction of energy conversion and transmission facilities, 1975; administration of the abandoned surface mine program, 1979; and investigation of consumer complaints, 1985. A member of the Public Service Commission serves as a member of the State Intermodal Transportation Team (1977). Currently the Public Service Commission has seven major divisions charged with monitoring and regulating public utilities in the state: Division of Weights and Measures, Motor Carrier Division, Public Warehouse Division, Reclamation Division, Traffic Division, Consumer Affairs Division, and the Public Utilities Division. The Public Service Commission is headquartered in the State Capitol in Bismarck.

CHRONOLOGY
1863       Railroads were to regulate themselves (T. L. 1863, Ch. 67).

1875       Laws were passed to regulate railroads in Dakota Territory by the Territorial Legislature. An 1875 law made railroads liable for damages in accidents causing fatalities (T. L. 1875, Ch. 54).

1879       Dakota Territory established the basis of future regulation of the railroad industry by providing legislation for the organization of railroad corporations and by outlining the organization, powers, and duties of railroads operating in the territory (T. L. 1879, Ch. 46).

1885       The Board of Railroad Commissioners was created. Sensitive to the growing presence and power of railroads in the territory the Territorial Legislature created a Board of Railroad Commissioners requiring them to take action whenever necessary (T. L. 1885, Ch. 126).

1887       Legislation broadened the scope of the Board of Railroad Commissioners by making them responsible for inspecting, grading, weighing, and storing of grain and seeds in the territory through licensing and bonding of public warehousemen and regulating the financial transactions of warehouses (T. L. 1887, Ch. 130).

1889       The Board was designated as a constitutional office by the 1889 Constitutional Convention to regulate the receiving and transporting of freight carried by railroads.  The Board of Railroad Commissioners was authorized by the North Dakota State Constitution (S. L. 1889, Ch. 110) and required three commissioners each were to be elected for a two-year term (North Dakota Constitution: Article V, Section 12).
 
1890       The Board of Railroad Commissioners was authorized in 1890 to appoint a State Weigh-master and a Chief Grain Inspector to supervise throughout the state the handling, inspecting, weighing, and storing of grain and the licensing of warehouses (S. L. 1890, Ch. 180 and Ch.138).  Additional legislation in 1890 allowed the Board of Railroad Commissioners to investigate railroads resulting from alleged violations of state law. Legal action was to be brought against actual violators (S. L. 1890, Ch. 122).  Legislation related to increasing the state debt limit (S. L. 1890, Ch. 115).

1897       The Legislature required the Commissioners to be responsible for regulation of bridges and ferries (S. L. 1897, Ch. 115).

1899       Legislation addressed the provision of payment for expenses brought about through litigation from orders enforced by the Board. Also included were any charges brought by the Attorney General on behalf of the Board of Railroad Commissioners (S. L. 1899, Ch. 131).
  
1907       The Board was to examine the causes of all train wrecks and send a yearly report to the Legislature (S.L. 1907, Ch. 205). Regular sessions for the Board of Railroad Commissioners were required a notice of time, manner, and place where sessions would be held. Powers and duties also were defined. Additionally the duty of the Attorney General in relation to the Board was addressed (S. L. 1907, Ch. 213). Senate Bill 340 asked for the creation of a Public Service Inquiry Commission to compile two reports that looked into and gathered pertinent data on the financial backgrounds and dealings of public service corporations. After the second report was submitted in July of 1908 the Public Service Inquiry Commission became obsolete (S. L. 1907, SB 340).

1909       The Board of Railroad Commissioners was authorized to appoint agents at the grain terminals in Duluth and Minneapolis and to monitor the grain trade to benefit North Dakota grain growers and shippers (S. L. 1909, Ch. 135). Legislation required establishing regular sessions for the Board of Railroad Commissioners and defined powers and duties of the Commissioners including rulings that involved the office of the Attorneys General (S. L. 1909, Ch. 194). The joint resolution authorized the Governor and the Attorney General to inquire and institute any necessary changes for bulk carrying charges from points within the state to terminal markets in Minnesota and Wisconsin (S. L. 1909, Ch. 136).

1911       The Board duties were expanded and adjustments made for all claims resulting from overcharges and losses. This included charges for transporting freight and for passenger fares.  A fee was required for licensing of grain warehouses (S. L. 1911, Ch.  240).

1913       The Board was required to establish a plan to formulate for a uniform system of accounting for public warehouses and grain elevators (S. L. 1913, Ch. 236). There were amendments relating to the licensing of railroad and steamboat ticket agents (S. L. 1913, Ch. 237).

1915       General supervision and regulation of the telephone industry including all persons, firms, corporations, and other agencies engaged in the business of furnishing communication by means of a “common carrier” were the responsibility of the Board (S. L. 1915, Ch. 209).  Regulation and adjustment of rates charged by public utilities to consumers were also under the authority of the Board of Railroad Commissioners (S. L. 1915, Ch. 208).

1919       The regulatory powers of the Board of Railroad Commissioners were enhanced and formally granted by the State Legislature during the 1919 session (S. L. 1919, Ch. 192).  This included authority over common carriers, railroads, street railroads, express companies, toll bridges, ferries, and freight and passenger steamboats. Fences were required on right of way lands (S. L. 1915, Ch. 193). Other inclusions were telegraph and telephone companies, electric companies distributing heat, light, or power, and all other public utility corporations. Food and agricultural product warehouses, packing and cold storage companies, and stockyard companies were also included in the legislation. Duties of the Commissioners included investigating all methods and practices of public utilities, enforcing state laws, and upholding regulations. The Commission could order changes for rates they considered unjust. Legislation also required the Board to regulate all activities such as construction or electrical supply and signal lines (S. L. 1919, Ch. 122). The Commissioners became full-time employees (Special Session S. L. 1919, Ch. 49). The Chairman of the Board of Railroad Commissioners was designated a member of the State Publications and Printing Commission and served in that capacity until 1959.

1923       Additional legislation over the years subjected bus systems and taxis to be regulated. The Board was responsible for compensation, regulation, and supervision of transportation involving persons and property on any public highway or by “motor propelled” vehicles (S. L. 1923, Ch. 136).

1925       Voters approved a constitutional amendment that required three Commissioners to be chosen by the electorate. One Commissioner would be elected every two years and hold office for a term of six years (Constitutional Amendment S. L. 1925, P. 315).
                                                                                                                               
1926       A constitutional amendment approved by voters on June 30, 1926 set six-year terms for the Commissioners of Railroads. Legislation took effect after the November 1926 general election. Because the terms were to be staggered the three Commissioners were elected for either a six, four, and two-year term (North Dakota Constitution: Article V, Section 12).
                                                                                               
1927       Legislation required Commission approval and certification of all public utility construction (S. L. 1927, Ch. 235). The Board could also designate (S. L.1927, Ch. 231) a special Assistant Attorney General as Commerce Counsel to the Board.

1929       Legislation required licensing and regulation of aircraft and pilots (S. L.1929, Ch. 231). This function was later transferred to the Aeronautics Commission.

1933       The Board was responsible for maintenance (S. L.1933, Ch. 269) of a Department of Weights and Measures. An amendment to legislation concerned the regulation of rates for all associations, firms, persons, and agencies engaged in business primarily conducted by companies of telephone or telegraph, gas, oil, and water. Legislation also included petitioning by the Board if rate charges by power companies for light and heat were questionable (S. L.1933, Ch. 220).

1937       The Board was required to provide for the regulation (S. L.1937, Ch. 8) of the roving grain buyers and of livestock dealers (S. L.1937, Ch. 5). Legislation provided for emergency appropriations for aid to be distributed to the appropriate county officer by the Public Welfare Board with assistance from the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor. Funding came in the form of loans for livestock feed (S. L. 1937, Ch. 6). The Board was required to test electric meters of electric utility companies and gas meters of gas utility companies (S. L. 1937, Ch. 202).  Legislation also related to jurisdiction and powers of the Board of Railroad Commissioners including hearings and investigations of public utilities (S. L. 1937, Chapters 203 to 208).

1940       A constitutional amendment adopted on June 25, 1940 created the Public Service Commission and transferred the powers and duties of the Board of Railroad Commissioners to the new Commission. The amendment also provided that two Commissioners would be elected during the general election. One term would be a four-year term and the other a six-year term.
 
1941       Reflecting the wide regulatory authority of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, the agency was renamed the Public Service Commission as approved by the voters and the Constitution was changed (Constitutional Measure S. L.1941, Article 57). Commissioner qualifications included being at least twenty-five years of age and a state elector. The duties of the Commissioners remained the same and the terms were for six-years staggered.

1945       A committee of aeronautics consisting of five members appointed by the Governor was created within the Public Service Commission (S. L.1945, Ch. 38).   

1947       The committee of aeronautics was replaced after the creation of the North Dakota Aeronautics Commission and the function of licensing and regulating pilots and aircraft was transferred to the Aeronautics Commission (S. L. 1947, Ch.1).  Legislation was amended concerning the appointment of examiners by the Public Service Commission (S. L. 1947, Ch. 307).
 
1953       The legislation was concerned with the charges for raising and lowering the electric supply and communication lines (S. L.1953, Ch. 284) and the construction and extension of plants, lines, or systems as they related to public utilities (S. L. 1953, Ch. 285). Changes were made in the implementation of eminent domain and the regulation of coal pipeline carriers or other common pipeline carriers (S. L. 1953, Ch. 325).  Legislation also concerned agricultural carriers (S. L. 1953, Ch. 334).

1963       With the advent of concentrated energy development in the state, the Public Service Commission assumed various responsibilities for regulation of the energy industry including coal, gas, oil, and water pipelines (S. L.1963, Ch. 325). Additionally an act repealed the Commission’s power to order, authorize, and permit any common carrier or to charge different rates on transportation of goods within the state (S. L.1963, Ch. 322).

1969       Legislation established safety requirements for public utilities extending the Commission’s regulatory control (S. L.1969, Ch. 414).

1971       Some agricultural commodities exempt from the Commission’s transportation regulations included dairy commodities, poultry, and livestock (S. L.1971, Ch. 461).

1973       The Public Service Commission was required to control all gas distribution systems (S. L.1973, Ch. 378) and to regulate strip mining, and land reclamation (S. L.1973, Ch.  285).

1975       Auctioneers and clerks requiring a license filed with the Commission (S. L.1975, Ch.449).  Sites for the construction of energy conversion and transmission facilities came under the authority of the Public Service Commission (S. L.1975, Ch.436 ) and Commissioners were required to fix terms when one utility crossed the lines of another (S. L.1975, Ch. 430).  Also legislation related to shipments of livestock by railroad and salaries for railroad employees (S. L. 1975, Ch. 431).

1977       A member of the Public Service Commission served on the State Intermodal Transportation Team and regulatory powers of the Public Service Commission over all railroads in the state was clarified. Earlier regulations were repealed (S. L.1977, Ch. 443). The Century Code was amended concerning the appointment of examiners by the Commission (S. L.1977, Ch. 438). Legislation concerned the powers of the Commission with reference to public utilities (S. L.1977, Ch. 439). The salaries of the Labor Commissioner and the Public Service Commissioners were amended by the Legislature effective on January 1, 1979 (S. L. 1977, Ch. 481). The Century Code was amended relating to changes of issuing a certificate to motor carriers (S. L.1977, Ch. 444). 

1979       Legislation related to Commission jurisdiction and to any exclusions of certain utilities (S. L.1979, Ch. 495).

1981       A new sub-section was added to the Century Code relating to Commission cooperation with the federal government over pipeline safety regulations. The Commission jurisdiction of pipeline safety and any violations of pipeline safety standards were also addressed (S. L.1981, Ch.471).

1983       The Commission was required to regulate the buyers of roving grain and hay (S. L.1983, Ch. 673) but could not  determine or fix the intrastate rates for transportation of grain and grain products moving to or from terminal grain elevators in the state. The Commission could inspect any licensed warehouse as well as the books, documents, and records (S. L.1983, Ch. 672). The Commission was permitted to examine a railroad’s records after abandonment of a line (S. L.1983, Ch. 517) and was allowed to require railroads with abandoned lines to keep property cleared and noxious weeds controlled (S. L.1983, Ch. 516). The Commission was given authority control public utilities through use of rate rules and other practices (S. L.1983, Ch.513). The jurisdiction over telegraph companies and nonprofit telephone companies or telephone companies with fewer than three-thousand subscribers was removed from the Commission’s authority (S. L.1983, Ch.512). The Commission gained general supervisory authority over contract motor carriers (S. L.1983, Ch. 519).

1985       Legislation concerned the issuing of temporary motor carrier permits (S. L.1985, Ch.514) and reference to the use of the word “telephone” was replaced with telecommunications (S. L.1985, Ch. 515).

1987       Procedural changes were made in licensing of auctioneers and clerks (S. L.1987, Ch. 588).  Legislation gave the Public Service Commission power to establish safety rules for motor carriers and authority to hold hearings in contract carrier cases. Highway maintenance costs were removed when certificates for common motor carriers were issued (S. L.1987, Ch.567).  Legislation eliminated statutes that had allowed for a separate classification while transporting lignite coal (S. L.1987, Ch. 566) and required the Commission to identify rights of way for railroad lines in service that could be sold, transferred, or leased (S. L.1987, Ch. 565).  The Commission could not suspend a public utility rate, classification, contract, practice, rule, or regulation after a notice had been filed or scheduled. An exception was made when common carriers on rail or by motor vehicle and were sent after schedules or notices had taken effect (S. L.1987, Ch.564).  A new section added to the Century Code related to work near high voltage overhead lines and also amendments related to work near high voltage overhead lines (S. L.1987, Ch. 568). Legislation concerned various fees charged by the Commission establishing a specific dollar amount instead of a set fee for the registration and identification of interstate motor carriers operating in the state (S. L.1987, Ch. 70).

1989       The State Highway Department was renamed the Department of Transportation and had responsibility for collecting interstate carrier registration fees and issuing identification stamps (S. L.1989, Ch. 72). The Motor Vehicle Department became authorized to assess interstate motor carrier registrations (S. L.1989, Ch.573). Amendments were made to the Century Code relating to the issuance of contract motor carrier permits (S. L.1989, Ch. 572) and to interstate motor carrier fees (S. L.1989, Ch. 573). Legislation concerned telecommunication rates and the Regulatory Reform Review Commission was established (S. L.1989, Ch. 566).  Public utilities did not need approval from the Commission concerning disposal, encumbrance, merger, or consolidation of tangible property with a value less than $500,000 (S. L.1989, Ch. 567). Legislation related to priority in the sale and use of abandoned railroad rights of way (S. L.1989, Ch. 568) and the Commission was no longer responsible for identifying the sale, transfer, or lease of railroad rights of way (S. L.1989, Ch.569). Additionally the Century Code was changed relating to fencing on railroad rights of way and maintenance of cattle guards and gates (S. L.1989, Ch. 570).  Legislation allowed the Commission to regulate transportation of saltwater produced or used in oil and gas exploration, development, and production (S. L.1989, Ch.571). References to the Department of Weights and Measures within the Public Service Commission were removed and legislation changed definitions relating to weight and measure terms (S. L.1989, Ch. 764).

1991       The Commission was given authority concerning any hazards at pipeline facilities (S. L.1991, Ch.497).

1993       Changes in the authority of the Commission concerned public utility hearings and fee charges. Several repeals relating to the Commission and public utilities were included in this legislation (S. L.1993, Ch.1). Susan Wefald was appointed to the Commission effective January 1, 1993.  Authority for the testing of oil and gas production meters became the responsibility of the Industrial Commission (S.L.1993, Ch.367). Additional changes were made relating to the jurisdiction of the Public Service Commission regarding telecommunications and telecommunication companies (S. L.1993, Ch.462). Legislation replaced the mandate of the Commission concerning railroad safety rules (S. L.1993, Ch.465) and also involved the unnecessary or unsafe or dangerous railroad crossings and Commission authority to respond by sending a notification or holding a hearing (S. L.1993, Ch. 278). Authority was given to the Commission over transportation of carbon dioxide by pipeline (S. L.1993, Ch.341). Legislation related to Commission authority over the compliance with federal environmental legislation (S. L.1993, Ch. 464) and also to hearings held by the Commission (S. L.1993, Ch.463).

1995       Changes included the authority of the Commission concerning hearings and fees of telecommunication companies (S. L.1995, Ch. 30). An amendment concerned the number of subscribers to a telecommunication companies and the jurisdiction of the Commission (S. L.1995, Ch. 445). Legislation related to unreasonable valuations costs for goods or services by public utility companies (S. L.1995, Ch.444). Publishing an energy conversion and transmission facility inventory for areas excluded or avoided was no longer the responsibility of the Commission (S. L.1995, Ch.454). The Commission was given a role in setting alleged costs and compliance concerns in relationship to environmental laws (S. L.1995, Ch.446). Motor carrier regulation by the Commission was repealed (S. L.1995, Ch.450). Language changes were made relating to weights and measures definitions and classifications (S. L.1995, Ch. 604). The concurrent resolution introduced by the House called for a constitutional amendment allowing the three Public Service Commissioners to continue to serve a six-year staggered term with a requirement that one be elected every two years. If voters approved this change, it would take place in 1996 (S. L.1995, Ch. 646).

1997       Legislation related to federal regulation law, intrastate commerce, and railroad activities (S. L.1997, Ch. 399). Various statutes were repealed concerning federal preemption and regulation by the Commission involving railroads (S. L.1997, Ch. 284).
                                                                                                                               
1999       Changes to the Century Code related to the regulation of hay buyers and roving grain buyers (S. L.1999, Ch.534). Weighing and measuring devices used by transient vendors were no longer regulated by the Commission (S. L.1999, Ch.547). Legislation eliminated the bond requirements for Commissioners (S. L.1999, Ch. 113).

2001       Legislation required the Commission to allow public utilities to recover costs resulting from coal severance tax and coal conversion tax when determining the value of property for rate-making purposes (S. L. 2001, Ch.535). The Commission did not need to compile an annual list of licensed auctioneers and clerks (S. L. 2001, Ch. 440).
                                                                               
2003       The Commission was authorized to investigate and resolve problems regarding the numbering system assigned under the authority of the “national information infrastructure dialing codes”. The purpose was to have a seamless web of public and private communications networks, interactive services with interoperable hardware and software, computers, databases, and consumer electronics (S. L. 2003, Ch. 405).

2005       Legislation gave the Commission authority to track, record, and verify trading of credits for electricity generated from renewable and recycled heat sources (S. L. 2005, Ch.393), to establish criteria for service agreements that included electric public utilities and rural electric cooperatives (S. L. 2005, Ch.394),  and to distinguished which telecommunication companies did not need to register with the Commission (S. L. 2005, Ch.395). Legislation concerned regulation of telecommunications, electronic filings of documents to replace a paper copy, and the deletion of all references to the Regulatory Reform Review Commission (S. L. 2005, Ch.399). The Commission had authority to ask companies to pay additional fees for completion of energy conservation facility sites, transmission facilities, corridor, and transmission facility routes for the purpose of establishing an expense recovery fund (S. L. 2005, Ch. 404). The Commission was allowed to impose penalties for violations of the statues governing the licensing of auctioneers and clerks of auctioneers (S. L. 2005, Ch.397).

2007       The Commission was not required to report annually to the Budget Section concerning the Performance Assurance Fund (S. L. 2007, Ch. 63). Legislation related to the local exchange subscribers of a telecommunications company and regulating action by the Commission (S. L. 2007, Ch.404). Additionally legislation concerned the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (S. L. 2007, Ch. 411). Legislation also concerned the adoption of rules governing the decommissioning of commercial wind energy conversion facilities (S. L. 2007, Ch. 505). Changes in weighing and measuring devices and the standards established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology were addressed (S. L. 2007, Ch. 565).

2009       The title “president” of the Public Service Commission was replaced with “chairman” (S. L. 2009, Ch.402). An amendment involved Commission authority in decommissioning wind energy conversion facilities and a directive concerned the role of the Commission in the development of natural resources (S. L. 2009, Ch. 404).

SOURCES
Gray, David P.  Guide to the North Dakota State Archives, 1985.
Laws of Dakota Territory.
Legislative History of North Dakota State Agencies: Richard J. Wolfert State Librarian. State Library Commission, 1978.
North Dakota Century Code.
North Dakota Secretary of State Blue Book.
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.

SERIES
30407 Administration. Secretary's Correspondence (R-Files).
30408 Administration. Orders.
30412 Administration. Office Ledger.
30413 Grain Elevator Division. License Cards Index.
30414 Commission Merchant's License Register.
30415 Ferry Licensing Files.
30417 Motor Carrier Division. Class "A" Motor Carrier Case Files
30418 Motor Carrier Division, Contract Motor Carrier Case Files
30419 Motor Carrier Division, Special Case Files
30420 Motor Carrier Division, Formal Traffic Case Files
30421 Motor Carrier Division. Transcript of Testimony in Traffic Case TC-1413
30422 Motor Carrier Division. Cases Filed Jointly with the Interstate Commerce
30423 Motor Carrier Division. Annual Reports of Motor Carriers.
30425 Public Utility Division. Formal Case Files.
30426 Public Utility Division. Informal Case Files.
30428 Public Utility Division. Card Index to Formal Case Files.
30429 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Telephone Utilities
30606 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Railroad Company
30607 Public Utility Division. Defunct Utilities Card File
30608 Grain Elevator Division. Investigation File.
30609 Public Utility Division. Telephone Statistics Ledger.
30610 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Telegraph and Express Companies
30611 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Power and Electric Companies
30612 Grain Elevator Division. Grain Elevator License Register.
30613 Grain Elevator Division. Grain Warehouse License Register.
30614 Public Utility Division. Formal and Informal Case Docket.
30615 Grain Elevator Division. Freight Schedules.
30616 Public Utility Division. Maps of Power Transmission Lines.
30627 Administration. Minutes.
30636 Public Utilities, Miscellaneous Reports of Telephone Utilities
30766 Public Utility Division. Federal Power Commission Case Files
31260 Administration. Public Service Commission Calendar.
31261 Administration, Index to Secretary's Correspondence
31262 Administration. Audit Reports.
31263 Administration. Subject Files.
31264 Administration, Employee Card Files
31296 Grain Elevator Division. Auctioneers Registers. (2 vol)
31304 Public Utility Division. A T & T Divestiture Records.
31338 Reclamation Division. Coal Mine Applications.
31351 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Pipeline Company
31352 Public Utility Division. Annual Reports of Natural Gas Com
31353 Formal Case files exhibits working papers
31403 Motor Carrier Division. Freight Tariffs.
31415 Engineering. Ten Year Plans.
31416 Engineering. Reports.
31418 Public Utilities Card File.
31421 Administration. Budget Files.
31424 Grain Elevator Division. Warehousemen License Card File.
31429 Livestock Division.  Livestock Dealers Record
31460 Mobile Radio Service Files
31481 Administration. Historic Site and State Park Deed File
31495 Commerce Counsel. Correspondence.
31534 Reclamation Division. Correspondence.
31535 Reclamation Division.  Mining companies
31554 Grain and Elevator Division. Roving Grain Buyer and Public Storage License
31576 Board of Railroad Commissioners. Case Docket
31583 Grain Elevator Division. Public Storage License Register.
31586 Reclamation Division. Correspondence
31587 Reclamation Division. Cooperative Agreements.
31588 Reclamation Division. Advisory Committee Memos.
31589 Reclamation Division. Extended Mine Plans
31698 Public Utility Division. Slide Photograph File.
31760 Public Utility Division. Old Utilities Rate Files.
31767 Reclamation Division. Solid Waste Disposal Files.
31835 Public Utility Division. Records of the Proceedings of ATT
31836 Grain Elevator Division. Grain and Railroad Rate Publication
31875 Reclamation Division. North Dakota Lignite Council Correspondence
31887 Reclamation Division. Subject Files for Surface Mining
31899 Motor Carrier  Division.  Index cards for Motor Carrier case files
31912 Public Utility Division. Corridor Hearing Tapes.
31957 Abandoned Mine Lands. AML Emergencies File
31958 ND Development Fund Plan and Policy
32012 Reference Maps
32102 Public Utilities. Exhibits
32180 Commissioner's Photographs.
32227 Commissioner Susan Wefald Records
32229 Administration, Railroad System Diagram Maps
32230 Administration. Railroad Reports & Summaries of Accidents, Illness
32231 Administration, Railway Operating Revenues of Class I Railroads
32232 Administration, Mileage Tariff Books
32284 Applications and Exhibits for Transmission Facility Permits
32315 Administration. Railroad Maps.
32316 Administration. General Highway Maps
32317 Public Utilities. Telephone Service Area Maps
32318 Administration. Highway Department Local Street Maps

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