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STATE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION
[Authorized:  Constitution, Article VIII, Section 6; NDCC Chapter 15-10]

Prior to 1911 all public colleges and the university were governed by independent boards of trustees whose members were appointed by the Governor. In that year the State Board of Normal School Trustees was created in 1911 to administer the affairs of the state normal schools. The Board consisted of three gubernatorial appointees serving staggered four-year terms and the Superintendent of Public Instruction serving as ex-officio president.

Established in 1915 (S. L. 1915, Ch. 237), the State Board of Regents had authority over all state colleges and the university. The State Board of Regents consisted of five members appointed by the Governor for six-year terms.

The State Board of Regents was abolished in 1919 and administration of state colleges and the university was transferred to the newly created Board of Administration. The Board of Administration continued to govern state colleges and the university until creation of the State Board of Higher Education in 1939.

Controversy surrounding political interference in the administration of the North Dakota Agricultural College and the firing of President John H. Sheppard and seven faculty members in 1937 precipitated the movement to create an independent board to govern state colleges and the university. Fueled by the subsequent withdrawal of the college's accreditation by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools in the same year, the alumni association circulated petitions for a constitutional amendment to remove control of the state colleges and the university from the Board of Administration. The amendment was approved by voters in 1938. The new board consisted of seven members, appointed by the Governor for seven-year terms, under procedures designed to carefully remove members as far as possible from political influence.

In February 1990 the Board took action creating a one-university system headed by a chancellor who serves as the system’s chief executive officer; presidents of each institution report directly to the chancellor.

The State Board of Higher Education consists of seven citizen members, one student member, and one non-voting faculty member. The Governor appoints the voting citizen members to four-year terms. In 1996 voters approved a constitutional amendment reducing terms from seven to four years. These terms require the consent of the majority of the state Senate. The Governor also appoints the voting student member to a one year term from a list of names submitted by the North Dakota Student Association. The Council of College Faculties annually selects the faculty representative to the Board.

The Board is the policy setting and advocacy body for the North Dakota University System. Decisions on issues with system wide implications are made by the Board and Chancellor in consultation with the cabinet (composed of the university presidents, executive dean, and vice chancellors). The CEOs of the institutions retain their authority in managing campus affairs.

The Chancellor’s office supports the Board in developing public policy for the system’s governance and in advocating on its behalf.

CHRONOLOGY

1879       Tower University opened at Tower City and it closed in1889.

1880       From 1880 until 1911 institutions of higher learning were administered by independent boards of trustees.

1883       The Presbyterian denomination opened Jamestown College as a private institution and the Dakota Territorial Assembly established the University in Grand Forks.

1884       The University at Grand Forks opened on September 8, 1884.

1887       The Territorial Legislature provided some support for teacher’s training in private schools including the Milnor Normal School. The Fargo College was established by the Congregationalist denomination.
                                                                                               
1889       Public institutions of higher learning that were specified in the 1889 North Dakota Constitution included Mayville and Valley City Normal Schools, the University at Grand Forks, the Agricultural College (NDSU) at Fargo, a scientific school at Wahpeton, and the School of Forestry at Bottineau. The Bruflat Academy at Portland opened shortly after statehood and taught secondary and post-secondary courses and the Territorial Legislature provided some support to the Academy.

1890       Milnor Normal School closed on June 15, 1890.  The North Dakota Agricultural College (NDSU) at Fargo and the Agricultural Experiment Station and the Agricultural Extension Division were a part of the college when it opened.  Additionally other institutions opening that year were the State Normal School at Valley City on October 13, 1890, and classes began at the State Normal School at Mayville on December 1, 1890. 

1891       The Methodist denomination established the Red River Valley University in Wahpeton and in Grand Forks Norwegian Lutherans set up the Grand Forks College. The Baptist denomination opened the Dakota College in Lisbon. 
                                                                                                                                               
1893       The State Normal and Industrial School at Ellendale was established by the Legislature as an Industrial School and School for Manual Training. Classes started in the fall of 1893. The Dakota College at Lisbon closed.

1894       Dates significant to the establishment of the State School of Forestry in Bottineau were October 1, 1889 and November 6, 1894.

1904       The State School of Science in Wahpeton opened in September, 1904. 

1906       Classes started at the Forestry School at Bottineau.

1905       The Methodist denomination established the Red River Valley University and moved it from Wahpeton to Grand Forks where it became Wesley College.

1910       The Norwegian Lutherans moved Grand Forks College to Velva and named it the Northwestern College.

1911       Normal schools were governed by the State Board of Normal School Trustees and the University of North Dakota and the North Dakota Agricultural College (NDSU) were managed by independent boards from 1911to1915 when the boards were replaced by the State Board of Regents. Significant dates for the State Normal School at Minot were November, 1911 and September 30, 1913.

1912       The Northwestern College in Velva closed.

1915       From 1915 until 1919 the State Board of Regents consisted of five members who served six-year terms and carried out administrative duties for all institutions of higher learning (S.L. 1915, Ch. 237).

1917       The State Normal School at Dickinson opened in 1917 and summer session started in 1918.

1919       The Legislature abolished the Board of Regents and placed the administration of public colleges and the University of North Dakota under a new agency the Board of Administration with responsibility for all institutions of higher learning.

1921       Wesley College School of Religion opened by the Wesley College of Grand Forks was later renamed the Fargo School of Religion in 1932, and named the North Dakota School of Religion.  It operated until 1962 when it donated building and land to the North Dakota State University Foundation in 1972.

1922       The Fargo College affiliated with the Congregationalist denomination merged with Yankton College in South Dakota.

1931       Enabling legislation allowed for the establishment of junior colleges. It was passed by the Legislative Assembly in 1931.

1935       The State Correspondence Study opened in Fargo.

1939       The first meeting of the Board of Higher Education took place in Bismarck on July 6, 1939 after its creation. The Board was responsible for the control and administration of University of North Dakota and School of Mines, State Agricultural College and the Fargo Experiment Station and Substations, State School of Science at Wahpeton, state normal schools and teachers colleges at Valley City, Mayville, Minot, and Dickinson, the Normal and Industrial School at Ellendale, School of Forestry at Bottineau, and any other state institutions of higher education that may be established (S. L. 1939, Article 54-Initiated Measure). Additional duties were added (S. L. 1939, Ch. 207). Bismarck Junior College was established as North Dakota's first two-year city college.

1940       The first Commissioner of the Board of Higher Education chosen by the Board was Robert Murphy who served until 1942.

1941       Devils Lake Junior College was established.

1942       Duties of the State Board of Higher Education included having full authority over the institutions under its control with the right to prescribe, limit, or modify the courses offered at the institutions, and to have full authority to organize (or re-organize) within constitutional and statutory limitations the work of each institution under its control, and to prescribe for all institutions a standard systems of accounts and records. The Department of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation (known as the State Board of Higher Education) at Grand Forks was expanded to include the services of Vocational Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, and the Defense Training Program. Albert Arnason served until September 1957 as Commissioner of the State Board of Higher Education.

1947       The State Board of Higher Education included the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (S. L. 1947, Ch. 170).

1948       Trinity Bible College in Devils Lake opened and in 1960 moved to Aberdeen, South Dakota.

1957       The University of North Dakota offered extension classes at the Williston Off-Campus Center. Arthur Mead became the third Commissioner of the Board serving from October 1957 until November 1963.

1959       Mary College in Bismarck opened as a four-year college offering nursing and education programs.

1960       North Dakota Agricultural College was renamed North Dakota State University.

1961       The Assumption College in Richardton opened and the college at Williston became known as the University of North Dakota-Williston Center.

1964       Kenneth Raschke served as Commissioner of the Board from July 1964 to September 1978.

1965       The Normal and Industrial School at Ellendale became the Ellendale Center-University of North Dakota.

1967       Trinity Bible Institute opened in Jamestown and later moved to Ellendale and became known as the Trinity Bible College in 1972.

1969       United Tribes Technical College opened in Bismarck.

1971       Legislation amended the powers and duties of the State Board of Higher Education concerning appointments and removal of employees from institutions of higher education and it fixed salaries and terms of office (S. L. 1971, Ch. 165). It also provided a procedure for the acceptance of buildings, the acceptance of gifts and bequests, and the sale of property received as a gift or bequest by the Board (S. L. 1971, Ch. 164). Legislation also addressed the confidentiality of the college records of students and former students (S. L. 1971, Ch. 166). The Assumption College in Richardton closed.

1973       The state school at Ellendale closed (S. L.1973, Ch. 131). The Legislature addressed the fiscal practices at institutions of higher education (S. L. 1973, Ch. 132) including out-of-state travel by employees of state institutions of higher education (S. L. 1973, Ch. 136), and granted the Board authority to establish an alternate retirement program (S. L. 1973, Ch. 133). It also established agreements of reciprocity (S. L. 1973, Ch. 137) and endowment fund investments (S. L. 1973, Ch. 138). Additionally it defined the “non-resident” student for tuition purposes (S.L. 1973, Ch. 134), provided free tuition for dependents of prisoners of war and soldiers missing in action while serving in Vietnam (S. L. 1973, Ch. 135), and required a vote on the use of tuition and fees at junior colleges (S. L. 1973, Ch. 139). Sitting Bull College opened in Fort Yates.

1974       In May Fort Berthold Community College opened at New Town and Cankdeska Cikana (Little Hoop) College at Fort Totten opened in October. The Turtle Mountain Community College also opened in 1974 and all three partnered with the University of North Dakota. Other North Dakota Tribal Colleges in this partnership were Sitting Bull College and United Tribes Technical College.

1975       Reciprocity agreements were amended (S. L. 1975, Ch. 131).

1977       Voters approved a measure clarifying the qualifications, compensation, and method of nomination for members of the Board of Higher Education (S. L. 1977, Ch. 597) and the members of the Board of Higher Education became the Postsecondary Education Commission (S. L. 1977, Ch. 158). The Legislature also required that a non-voting advisory representative from the North Dakota Student Association attend and provide input at all Board meetings (S. L. 1977, Ch. 145) and legislation changed the age of a non-resident student tuition from twenty-one to eighteen (S. L. 1977, Ch. 147).  

1978       Kent Alm served as the fifth Commissioner of the State Board of Higher Education from September 1978 to September 1981.

1979       A new subsection was added to the Century Code [NDCC15-10-17] concerning a policy whereby institutions of higher education were to coordinate purchasing with the Department of Accounts and Purchases (S. L. 1979, Ch. 568).  There was a change in legislation relating to the employee retirement program (S .L. 1979, Ch. 206) and to liability insurance (S.L. 1979, Ch. 207). There were language changes concerning the free tuition law (S. L. 1979, Ch. 215) and clarifications of definitions relating to veteran and dependent benefits (S. L. 1979, Ch. 215).

1981       John Richardson served as the sixth Commissioner of the Board.

1983       Legislation amended a tuition waiver for dependents of disabled or deceased veterans, prisoners of war, or veterans declared missing in action (S. L. 1983, Ch. 195).  Additionally the accepting gifts and bequests by the Board and transferring custody of school funds to the State Treasurer was addressed (S. L. 1983, Ch. 82). Legislation also addressed clarification of the jurisdiction over junior colleges and off-campus educational centers (S. L. 1983, Ch. 192) that were a part of the North Dakota’s system of Higher Education. Additional authority was given to the Board to enter into regional education compact agreements (S. L. 1983, Ch. 197) and the student advisory representative qualifications were changed (S. L. 1983, Ch. 193).

1984       On July 1, 1984 the governance and control of the Bismarck Junior College was transferred from the Bismarck School Board to the State Board of Higher Education.

1985       A new subsection was added to the Century Code relating to early retirement of faculty and officers of the Board (S. L. 1985, Ch. 205) and some college teachers under the Teachers’ Fund for Retirement (S. L. 1985, Ch. 204).

1987       A normal school became known as a university  and included Valley City, Mayville, Minot, and Dickinson (S. L. 1987, Ch. 3).  A new section to the Century Code addressed the supervision of the junior college located at Devils Lake as a branch of the University of North Dakota which was called the University of North Dakota-Lake Region. The Legislative Assembly changed Bismarck Junior College’s name to Bismarck State College effective April 27, 1987 and legislation concerned an alternate retirement program for employees at institutions under the control of the State Board of Higher Education (S. L. 1987, Ch. 199) including faculty at Bismarck Junior College (S. L. 1987, Ch. 197). Legislation also concerned payment of mileage and travel expenses for employees of institutions of higher education (S. L. 1987, Ch. 203). Other changes included confidentiality of proprietary information (S. L. 1987, Ch. 200) and a requirement concerning English language proficiency of faculty employed by institutions of higher education (S. L. 1987, Ch. 198). The term resident veteran was defined (S. L. 1987, Ch. 201), free tuition was offered to survivors of firefighters or peace officers (S. L. 1987, Ch. 202), and the selective service registration requirement and eligibility for student financial aid was addressed (S. L. 1987, Ch. 204).

1989       The Board was directed to develop a seven-year comprehensive state plan and report the findings to the Governor, a special Legislative Council Committee, and the organizational session of the Legislative Assembly.  An addition to the Century Code provided for a seven-year plan for the “system” of higher education including procedures for implementing the plan (S. L. 1989, Ch. 193).  Legislation addressed Board partnership agreements with private enterprise (S. L. 1989, Ch. 195).  It also addressed an amendment to annuity purchases in the alternate retirement program by employees of institutions under the control of the State Board of Higher Education (S. L. 1989, Ch. 194).  Name changes included the North Dakota State University of Agriculture and Applied Science and the Agricultural Experiment Station at Fargo with their substations or centers (S. L. 1989, Ch. 34).

1990       The Board created the “one-university system” that was to be served by a Chancellor. John Richardson who was selected as the sixth Commissioner of the Board in 1981 continued in the role of Chancellor until September 1990. In October 1990 Thomas Clifford became the Chancellor.

1991       Thomas Clifford served as Chancellor until July 1991 and Douglas Treadway became Chancellor of the Board of Higher Education. A seven-year plan was presented to the Legislative Council Committee and the Governor (S. L. 1991, Ch. 600).  Another change included legislation concerning investment income disposition (S. L. 1991, Ch. 578). Concerning the student representative serving on the Board, an amendment required the North Dakota Student Association Executive Board to name a representative to the State Board of Higher Education for a one-year term (S. L. 1991, Ch. 160) and legislation changed the title of the student representative to an advisory representative who would be selected from lists from the North Dakota Student Association and the Council of College Faculties (S. L. 1991, Ch. 159).  The definition for dependents of veterans for purposes of receiving free tuition was clarified (S. L. 1991, Ch. 161), other free tuition changes were addressed (S. L. 1991, Ch. 3), and there was an addition to the Century Code concerning political advertising in student housing units at institutions of higher education (S. L. 1991, Ch. 163).

1993       Higher education institution financial statements were required quarterly (S. L. 1993, Ch. 164) and there was a clarification concerning English proficiency language skills (S. L. 1993, Ch. 163).  Changes were made relating to tuition waivers at state-supported institutions of higher education and state-supported technical or vocational schools (S. L. 1993, Ch. 165), and changes were made concerning the definition of non-resident and resident student tuition (S. L. 1993, Ch. 166). The student advisory representative no longer had to be a full time student and was required to carry a minimum of six credits (S. L. 1993, Ch. 162).

1994       In February Chancellor Douglas Treadway was replaced and Co-chancellors Larry Isaak and Gene Kemper were selected.  Kemper served until July 1994 when Larry Isaak became Chancellor of the State Board of Higher Education serving until 2003.

1995       A House Concurrent Resolution that passed during the 1993 session (S. L. 1993, Ch. 664) proposed a constitutional amendment that would require the Board to be increased to eight members (S. L. 1995, Ch. 642). Legislation also required the Legislative Council and the Governor to meet with the Board of Higher Education every six years to review the status of the University System, and to establish long term goals, and to meet annually with Legislative Council and the Governor (S. L. 1995, Ch. 166). There were changes to the content of the higher education seven-year plan (S. L. 1995, Ch. 167), to procedures concerning gifts and bequests (S.L. 1995, Ch. 5), to student admission criteria (S. L. 1995, Ch. 168), and to the definition of a resident student (S. L. 1995, Ch. 169).

1997       Another constitutional amendment proposed by the Senate required changes to the make-up of the Board by reducing the term of service by Board members from seven years to four years (S.L. 1997, Ch. 569) and other changes required the Budget Sections approval of a “specific dollar amount limit” for each project submitted by an institution before gifts for building or campus improvements would be accepted (S. L. 1997, Ch. 156).  Legislation addressed the confidentiality of information regarding grants and contracts of institutions of higher education (S. L. 1997, Ch. 155).

1999       The Board of Higher Education presented its report on the higher education system to the Legislative Council instead of the full Assembly (S. L. 1999, Ch. 158). The Council of College Faculties continued to appoint a non-voting advisor to the Board. Other steps [Constitution Article VII, Section 6] were taken by the Legislature to clarify the language in the Century Code [NDCC 15-10-02] relating to the Board (S. L. 1999, Ch. 154) and numerous amendments to laws related to higher education (S. L. 1999, Ch. 157). There was an amendment to money transfers and deposits by the State Treasurer for funds received by institutions of the Board of Higher Education (S. L. 1999, Ch. 155), legislation related to the authority of a state agency or institutions to expand a building project or to limit building and other campus improvements (S.L. 1999, Ch. 156), and an act by the Legislative Assembly authorized construction of a winter sports facility at the University of North Dakota (S. L. 1999, Ch. 159). Name changes were made for the following junior college institutions: University of North Dakota-Lake Region was changed to Lake Region State College, and the University of North Dakota-Williston Center became Williston State College.  Also language was changed to legislation relating to work force training programs (S. L. 1999, Ch. 439).  Legislation changed the agreements concerning non-resident tuition rates, agreements for the remission of non-resident tuition, and reciprocal tuition agreements (S. L. 1999, Ch. 161).

2001       The proposed amendment by the 1999 Legislative Assembly (S. L. 1999, Ch. 568) concerned the Constitution as approved by the voters and legislative changes to the Board membership (S. L. 2001, Ch. 590). The North Dakota University System became a unified system of higher education [NDCC 15-10-01.3].  Legislation required the Board to develop a plan and to report annually as to the performance, accountability, and progress of the plan and to submit a status report to the Legislative Assembly (S. L. 2001, Ch. 159). A new section [NDCC 15-10] was added to the Century Code concerning capital construction projects approved after July 1, 2003 (S. L. 2001, Ch. 15) and related to legislative approval of capital improvement projects financed by donations, gifts, grants, and bequests (S. L. 2001, Ch. 160).  Legislation regarding budget appropriations included language changes (S. L. 2001, Ch. 28).  There were extensive revisions to the education law (S. L. 2001, Ch. 161). Additionally amendments were made to resident tuition at state institutions of higher education (S. L. 2001, Ch. 164), a technology occupations student loan program was established (S. L. 2001, Ch. 165), and a student loan forgiveness program provided for those who were preparing to teach at grade levels or in content areas due to a teacher shortage (S. L. 2001, Ch. 166).

2003       The State Board of Higher Education was to establish the centers of excellence program linked to economic development [NDCC 15-10-41] and designate the locations of the centers consistent with the Board’s membership requirements. Legislation spelled out the purpose of the program, the source of fund allocations, and the involvement of the North Dakota Economic Development Foundation (S. L. 2003, Ch. 18). Legislation established a Board to manage the Indian Cultural Trust (S. L. 2003, Ch. 144). Also policy relating to contract-preparation for the provision of meals at institutions (S. L. 2003, Ch. 36) and authority was given to the institutions of higher education concerning summer school room and meal fees (S. L. 2003, Ch. 132). The State Board of Vocational and Technical Education became the State Board for Career and Technical Education (S. L. 2003, Ch.138). There were changes to the student financial assistance program that included the addition of a scholars program (S. L. 2003, Ch. 143). Changes were also made to school district employee compensation reports (S. L. 2003, Ch. 145). Larry Isaak left the position of Chancellor.

2004       Robert L. Potts became Chancellor of the State Board of Higher Education.

2005       The State Board of Higher Education was required to create a policy for all institutions under its control concerning the assessment of faculty and communication skills relating to English pronunciation (S. L. 2005, Ch. 144). Special revenue legislation was amended (S. L. 2005, Ch. 139) along with an expansion of tuition waivers for dependents of veterans (S. L. 2005, Ch. 140), and tuition benefits also related to public safety personnel dependents (S. L. 2005, Ch. 141). An amendment changed the definition of a resident student (S. L. 2005, Ch. 142). Other legislation related to the eligibility for loans under the technology occupations student loan program and the eligibility for loan forgiveness under the teacher shortages loan forgiveness program (S. L. 2005, Ch. 143). Legislation also concerned the provision of funding for the veterinary medical education program (S. L. 2005, Ch. 145) and repealed Centers of Excellence (S. L. 2005, Ch. 151).

2007       Appropriations allowed for an amendment to the veterinary medical education program with Kansas State University (S. L. 2007, Ch. 3) and other appropriation funding was amended (S. L. 2007, Ch. 152). Also addressed were amendments relating to services providing food and catering by institutions of higher education and school districts (S. L. 2007, Ch. 153). Two new sections were added to the Century Code relating to higher education technology, telecommunications, and information services competition. Legislation also concerned the powers and duties of the Information Technology Committee and amendments to the Century Code concerning the Information Technology Department, information technology standards, and information technology plans (S. L. 2007, Ch. 154). A name change from Legislative Council to Legislative Management required language changes to contracts found in programs such as the veterinary medical education program (S. L. 2007, Ch. 482). William Goetz served as Chancellor of the State Board of Higher Education.

2009       Legislation addressed the Information Technology Department’s involvement in a state-wide information plan as it related to the institutions of higher education (S. L. 2009, Ch. 517). Changes were made in language and additional subsections relating to the Division of Workforce Development and the annual report for the state’s system of workforce development (S. L. 2009, Ch. 46) that included the Job Service North Dakota, the Department for Career and Technical Education, and the State Board of Higher Education concerning the respective agency’s current workforce initiatives and activities and future plans as part of a statewide consolidated biennial strategic plan[NDCC 54-60-19]. Changes to sections of the State Board of Higher Education included additional responsibility in administrative and financial duties of the Board and related to joint meetings with the State Board of Public School Education, the State Board of Higher Education, Education Standards and Practices Board, and State Board for Career and Technical Education (S. L. 2009, Ch. 31). Legislation required the Board to submit to Legislative Management the allowed number of North Dakota academic scholarships and career and technical education scholarships. A subsection was added to the Century Code concerning tuition and tuition waivers for veterans and their dependents (S. L. 2009, Ch. 158). A name change was approved for the School of Forestry at Bottineau to become the Dakota College at Bottineau (S. L. 2009, Ch. 155). The Legislative Assembly allowed appropriations effective through June 20, 2011 to the Board including gifts and bequests (S. L. 2009, Ch. 157). 

2011       Legislation created and enacted a new section to [NDCC15-10] relating to the athletic Sioux nickname and logo. Neither the University of North Dakota nor the State Board of Higher Education could take any action to discontinue the use of the fighting Sioux nickname or the fighting Sioux logo in use on January 1, 2011. If the National Collegiate Athletic Association chose to take action to penalize the University of North Dakota for using the fighting Sioux nickname or logo, the Attorney General was to consider filing a federal antitrust claim against that Association (S. L. 2011, Ch. 118). Additional legislation concerned the Higher Education Board and the requirement to appoint a senate staff member advisor (S. L. 2011, Ch. 116),  a new section was added to the Code [NDCC 15-10] of the North Dakota Century Code relating to variance reports for certain construction projects at institutions of higher education (S. L. 2011, Ch. 119), and to the powers and duties of the Information Technology Department [NDCC 15.1-02-18.1] concerning provisions for the Longitudinal Data System  (S. L. 2011, Ch. 127). Other legislation concerned student scholarship eligibility (S. L. 2011, Ch. 143) and a request to study of student fees (S. L. 2011, Ch. 415).

2012       Hamid Shirvani replaced William Goetz as Chancellor and served for one year.

2013       The Legislative Assembly by House Concurrent Resolution proposed to qualified electors of the state a Constitutional Amendment to create and enact a new section to Article VII of the North Dakota Constitution relating to the creation of a three-member Commission of Higher Education to oversee and administer the provision of all public higher education in the state  including  Bismarck, Bottineau, Devils Lake, Dickinson, Fargo, Grand Forks, Mayville, Minot, Valley City, Wahpeton, and Williston  and to repeal Section VI of Article VII of the Constitution relating to the State Board of Higher Education.  The proposal was scheduled for placement on the 2014 general election ballot (S. L. 2013, Ch. 521). Additionally legislation related to the need for the approval of goods and services by the Budget Section (S. L. 2013, Ch. 135).  Other legislation concerned the approval for campus building donations when the Legislature was not in session (S. L.2013, Ch. 357) and higher education funding determination (S. L. 2013, Ch. 138). A Concurrent Resolution was approved for use of open textbooks in higher education courses (S. L. 2013, Ch. 527). Student program legislation related to a study concerning a professional student exchange program (S. L. 2013, Ch. 131), student financial assistance and scholars program allocation change (S. L. 2013, Ch. 144), appropriation for the veterans assistance programs (S. L. 2013, Ch. 29), and the repeal of student financial assistance and scholars fund deposit (S. L. 2013, Ch. 145). Larry Skogen serves as Interim Chancellor.

SOURCES
Gray, David P.  Guide to the North Dakota State Archives, 1985.
Legislative History of North Dakota State Agencies: Richard J. Wolfert State Librarian. State Library Commission, 1978.
North Dakota Century Code.
North Dakota Secretary of State Blue Book.
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.

SERIES
31016 Administrative Files
31017 Administration. Board Minutes
31018 Administration. Council of College and University Presidents Minutes
31019 Administration
31020 Administration. Budget Files
31021 Administration. Special Studies and Reports
31022 Administration. Property Inventories for UND
31023 Administration. Appraisals of State Colleges and Universities
31024 Administration. Investigations Files
31025 Administration. Photographs
31026 Administration. Scrapbook
31390 Postsecondary Education Commission. Records
31391 Facilities Commission. Minutes
31407 Administration. Agendas
31408 HEGIS Reports on North Dakota
31409 Administration. Enrollment Projection Reports
31410 Administration. Elementary, Secondary, Postsecondary Models Support Document
31411 Administration. Accreditation Report
31412 Administration Academic Affairs Council Files
31413 Administration. Statewide Planning for Nursing Committee Files
31414 Administration. Graduate Studies Advisory Committee Files
31523 Administration. President and Board Member Memoranda
31758 Administration. Experiment Station Files
31971 Administration. Policy Manual

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