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MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET, OFFICE OF
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 54-44]
               
On June 25, 1940 the initiated measure to institute a massive governmental reorganization and create a State Board of Finance and Administration to assume the duties of the Industrial Commission, Board of Administration, State Securities Commission, State Budget Board, State Auditing Board, and the State Publication and Printing Commission was disapproved by voters and an effort to consolidate many administrative and fiscal functions in state government failed. Until the Governmental Reorganization Act of 1959 created the office known as the Department of Accounts and Purchases, governmental entities (state agencies, boards, and commissions) provided fiscal, administrative, and support services.

In 1959 the Department of Accounts and Purchases was charged with state fiscal and support services (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372) and the first Divisions to be set in place included the Division of Accounting and Payroll, the Office of Central Data Processing, the Printing Division, and the Purchasing Division. In 1965 the Office of the Budget was established. In 1975 Central Personnel Division became a part of the Department of Accounts and Purchases and in 1979 the Office of Intergovernmental Assistance was added. Surplus Property Division was removed from the Department of Public Instruction and placed within the Office of Management and Budget. Additionally in 1969 legislation determined that an office called the Director of Institutions [NDCC 54-21 and 54-23] should be created (S. L. 1969, Ch. 440) although it was not a part of the Department of Accounts and Purchases. 

Since 1981 (S. L. 1981, Ch. 534) when the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) replaced the Department of Accounts and Purchases, it has had general responsibility for the control and supervision of the fiscal administration of Executive Branch state agencies and has provided specialized support services to state government. The Director of the Office of Management and Budget appointed by the Governor serves as ex-officio Director of the Budget and has been the supervisor of OMB. In 1991 the Legislature eliminated the office of the Director of Institutions along with the functions including supervisory control, powers, duties, submission of records and reports, and authorization to acquire property that were transferred to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget or to an “appropriate state agency, department, or institution”.  Also the Facility Management Division was created and placed within the Office of Management and Budget on July 1, 1991.

In 1999 appropriations funded the following Divisions within Office of Management and Budget: Administration, Fiscal Management, Facility Management, Central Personnel, the Division of Community Services (Intergovernmental Assistance), Risk Management, and the Statewide Compensation Plan.

In 2013 the Office of Management and Budget website and the (North Dakota Blue Book) listed four Divisions within the Office.  In alphabetical order they are: 1) Central Services Division which provides to state agencies services for purchasing, duplicating, central supply, and surplus property, 2) The Facility Management Division provides services for the overall daily operations of the state Capitol complex and surrounding grounds and the Capitol central mailroom staff provides mail services to all agencies located on the state Capitol grounds. Additionally the budgeting, planning, and construction staff manage all repair and capital projects. Along with other duties staff serve on the Capitol Grounds Planning Commission, 3) The Fiscal Management Division oversees the budgeting, accounting, payroll, and financial reporting functions for North Dakota state government entities. The budget staff, along with the Governor and the Governor’s staff develop the executive budget recommendations which are presented to the Legislature prior to each legislative session. The budget staff monitors and supports the executive budget recommendation through final passage by the Legislature and approval by the Governor, 4) Human Resource Management Services assist state agency leaders, managers, supervisors, and employees in order to promote consistency in human resource management practices statewide. Other services include maintaining classification and compensation plans, providing recruitment services to agencies,  providing training opportunities for state employees, acting as a mediation service for  state employees and managers. 

CHRONOLOGY

1941       The Legislative Assembly appointed a Governmental Survey Commission to study the field of governmental reorganization and provide recommendations such as creating a single agency to handle the state’s fiscal affairs and authorized the Board of Administration to set up a Central Mailing Bureau in the Capitol (S. L. 1941, Ch. 214).

1957       The Legislative Assembly was directed to review a governmental survey commissioned in 1941.  The Merit System Council was established and the Superintendent of Public Instruction became administrator of the Surplus Property Division.

1959       The Governmental Reorganization Act of 1959 (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372) created the Department of Accounts and Purchases to become operative in 1961. Within the new Department the functions of the State Board of Auditors were absorbed.  The Department of Accounts and Purchases was created with Divisions including the centralization of EDP (electronic data processing) resources, Accounting Services, State Purchasing, and State Printing.

1961       The Secretary of State served as the State Records Administrator until 1983.

1965       The Office of the Budget was created.

1969       The State Planning Division established and remained until 1979.

1974       The Office of Energy Management was created.

1975       The State Personnel Board was created.

1979       Legislation created the Federal Aid Coordinator Office. Also a report from the Department of Account and Purchases was required to cover activities from all the Divisions within the Department (S. L. 1979, Ch. 560).

1981       Legislation created the Office of Management and Budget to replace the Department of Accounts and Purchases (S. L. 1981, Ch. 534) and expanded the duties of the Office. Language changes were made and the Director was appointed by the Governor (S. L. 1981, Ch. 1), (S. L. 1981, Ch. 534), (S. L. 1981, Ch. 535).

1983       The Office of Intergovernmental Assistance was created as a Division within the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1983, Ch. 570). It was later moved to Department of Commerce, Community Services Division. The Records Management Division was transferred to the Office of Management and Budget and legislation concerning standardization of forms was passed. In 1999 it became a part of Information Technology Department.

1991       Legislation concerned procedures relating to the sale of state property (S. L. 1991, Ch. 610) and the selling, leasing, exchanging, or transferring the title or use “to all or part” of San Haven properties (S. L. 1991, Ch. 616). Legislation related to the authority of the Office of Management and Budget concerning special funds and financial reports of any state department, agency, board, commission, college, university, or institution (S. L. 1991, Ch. 612).
Additionally the functions of the Director of Institutions were transferred primarily to the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1991, Ch. 592). Other changes were made to the powers and duties of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1991, Ch. 609). A Facility Management Division was created and placed within the Office of Management and Budget on July 1, 1991 and the Radio Communications Division (created in 1951) was also transferred to OMB with the elimination of the Director of Institutions office. Legislation regarding the purchasing of state motor vehicles was repealed (S. L. 1991, Ch. 611).

1995       Legislation concerned the authority of the Office of Management and Budget in seeking reimbursements for assessments by the US Department of Education regarding default costs on student loans at institutions of higher education (S. L. 1995, Ch. 521).

1997       Changes were made to the Department’s continuing appropriations procedures (S. L. 1997, Ch. 459).

1999       The Legislature funded appropriations for the divisions/departments within the Office of Management and Budget including Administration, Fiscal Management, Facility Management, Central Personnel, the Division of Community Services (Intergovernmental Assistance), Risk Management, and the Statewide Compensation Plan.There were changes to [NDCC 54-44.4] regarding the State Radio Broadcasting System (S. L. 1999, Ch. 474). A grant to Prairie Public Broadcasting was appropriated to the University Systems Office for the purpose of providing matching funds for phase-one of the project to convert to digital television broadcasting (S. L. 1999, Ch. 37).

2003       The Division of Emergency Management and State Radio Communications were combined to establish an integrated State Operations Center.

2005       The State Legislature created the North Dakota Department of Emergency Services to include the Division of Homeland Security and the State Radio Communications. 

2009       The Office of Management and Budget was required to develop a report for the construction of facilities occupied by state agencies located on the Capitol grounds (S. L. 2009, Ch. 506).

A brief chronological history of the Divisions absorbed or transferred follows.

Division of Accounting and Payroll /Office of the Budget   (1959/1965)
[Authorized:  NDCC Chapter 54-44.1]

Systematic review and audit of all claims made against the state began with creation of the State Auditing Board in 1901 (S. L. 1901, Ch. 33). Initially the State Auditing Board consisted of the Governor, State Auditor, and the Attorney General with the State Treasurer and the Secretary of State added to the State Auditing Board in 1911. The State Auditing Board had responsibility for preparation of estimates of state budget appropriations for the State Legislature and exercised control over the state's accounting and payroll functions. Preparation of state budgets was originally the duty of the State Auditor beginning in 1913 (S. L. 1913, Ch. 63) and in 1915 preparation and management of the state budget became the responsibility of the State Budget Board (S. L. 1915, Ch. 61).

The State Budget Board consisted of the Governor, chairmen of the Senate and House Appropriations Committees, State Auditor, and the Attorney General. In 1947, the State Budget Board was authorized to appoint a Director of the Budget for a two-year term. The Director of the Budget was required to prepare a biennial budget report to the State Budget Board and to make recommendations on improving efficiency and economy in state government. In 1959 as a part of the Governmental Reorganization Act the responsibility for preparation of state government budgets was transferred to the Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases. The membership of the State Budget Board changed in the same year to include the Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases, Secretary of State, and the Attorney General. In 1963 the membership of the State Budget Board reverted back to its original combination. The State Budget Board was repealed with the creation of the Office of the Budget within the Department of Accounts and Purchases in 1965 (S. L. 1965, Ch. 358). The responsibilities of the Office of the Budget consisted of obtaining budget data from state agencies, preparing biennial executive budgets along guidelines provided by the Governor, supervising state expenditures to assure conformance to budgetary and legislative requirements, preparing budget and state revenue projections, and auditing and approving all claims and bills made against the state. The Office of the Budget was created under the Fiscal Records Act (S. L. 1965, Ch. 345) and established within the Department of Accounts and Purchases.

In 1965 the State Auditing Board delegated authority to the Director of Accounts and Purchases (S. L. 1965, Ch. 304). The Office of the Budget assumed all of the duties of the State Auditing Board in 1973 (S. L. 1973, Ch. 110). In 1981 the Office of Management and Budget Director as agency head was given control and supervision of the fiscal administration of the Executive Branch of state government. The Director appointed the Executive Budget Analyst. As the state's central professional fiscal office the Executive Budget Analyst with management and fiscal analysts prepared the Governor's executive budget recommendation for submission to the Legislative Assembly. As the sole financial plan for providing state services, the executive budget recommendation was presented to the Legislative Assembly prior to the convening of each session. Part of the budget process involved the Office of the Budget in hearings for each agency budget request, onsite visits, and comparative analyses. Once the executive budget recommendations were submitted the Office worked closely with the Legislative Assembly and its committees by explaining the budget or by providing information on other fiscal concerns. During both the legislative session and the Legislative Council's (Legislative Management) interim study period the Office of the Budget provided assistance to legislators and other key policymakers in resolving budget-related issues.

Increasingly after 1959 responsibility for accounting and payroll duties came under the supervision of the Department of Accounts and Purchases and later the Office of Management and Budget. The Division of Accounting and Payroll [NDCC Section 54-44-04] within the Office of Management and Budget supervised financial transactions of state government, maintained accounts controlling the state's resources, obligations, reserves, surpluses, revenues, and expenditures for each fund. Additionally it supervised state collections, issued warrants for approved claims, issued current financial status reports for state agencies, prepared the state payroll, and established accounting procedures for state agencies. By 2003 all state financial transactions were processed by accounting with responsibility to maintain the state's central accounting and payroll functions such as handling all agencies' payrolls except for institutions of Higher Education, the Bank of North Dakota, the State Mill and Elevator, and Job Service North Dakota. Accounting was also responsible to monitor activities of all funds in the State Treasury. See Office of Management and Budget, Division of Fiscal Management

CHRONOLOGY

1893       A State Board of Auditors consisting of the Secretary of State, State Auditor, and Attorney General was created (S. L. 1893, Ch. 48) to examine and audit the books of the State Treasurer and the State Treasury.

1901       Systematic review and audit of all claims made against the state began with creation of the State Auditing Board in 1901 (S. L. 1901, Ch. 33). The Board existed until 1973.
                                                                                                                               
1911       The State Treasurer and Secretary of State were added to the State Auditing Board and the Board of Control was created (S. L. 1911, Ch. 51) and existed until 1919.

1913       The first preparation for a state budget became the responsibility of the State Auditor who sent forms to all state departments, commissions, and boards requesting a complete funding proposal covering two legislative sessions (S. L. 1913, Ch. 63).

1915       Preparation and management of the state budget became the responsibility of the newly created State Budget Board under the authority of the State Auditor (S. L. 1915, Ch. 227). Until 1965 the Board prepared estimates for the state budget and submitted recommendations to the Legislature (S. L. 1915, Ch. 61).

1919       The State Examiner and the Commissioner of Insurance replaced the State Auditor and the Secretary of State as members of the State Auditing Board. In the Special Session of 1919 the newly created state-owned utilities, enterprises, business projects, and other specified industries were made exempt from fiscal review and audit by the State Auditing Board (Special Session S. L. 1919, Ch. 21).

1920       During the 1920s and 1930s the State Board of Auditors was made responsible for review and audit of the Bank of North Dakota and other state agencies.

1923       The State Auditor and Secretary of State replaced the Commissioner of Insurance and Attorney General on the State Auditing Board (S. L. 1923, Ch.135).

1947       The State Budget Board was authorized to appoint a Director of the Budget to serve a two-year term. Upon examination of all phases of state government the Director was to submit to the Legislative Assembly recommendations for governmental reorganization based on the biennial budget reports (S. L. 1947, Ch. 330).

1959       Accounting services fell to the Division of Accounting and Payroll (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372) and (S. L. 1959, Ch. 373). Additionally the Director (or designee) of the Department of Accounts and Purchases compiled the budget report to aid State Budget Board members in making recommendations to the Legislature. Also the Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases replaced the State Auditor as secretary of the State Budget Board (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372) and remained on the State Budget Board from 1959 to1963.

1963       The membership of the State Budget Board included the Governor, Chairmen of the House and Senate and Appropriations Committee, State Auditor, the Secretary of State, and five representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House and three Senators appointed by the Lieutenant Governor (S. L. 1963, Ch. 349) and the State Auditing Board delegated authority to the Director of Accounts and Purchases to assume the duties of accounting and payroll (S. L. 1963, Ch. 348).

1965       The Office of the Budget was created under the Fiscal Records Act (S. L. 1965, Ch. 345) and established within the Department of Accounts and Purchases. There was a provision for a Legislative Budget Analyst and Auditor (S. L. 1965, Ch. 357) who were appointed by the Legislative Research Committee. Legislation repealed the State Budget Board (S. L. 1965, Ch. 358) and the State Auditing Board delegated authority to the Director of Accounts and Purchases (S. L. 1965, Ch. 304).

1973       The State Auditing Board was repealed and the Office of the Budget assumed all of the duties (S. L. 1973, Ch. 110). 

1975       The Department of Accounts and Purchases was required to receive biennial reports from state agencies (S. L. 1975, Ch. 466).

1979       There were changes in the powers and duties delegated to the Director of the Accounts and Purchases Department and the Office of the Budget relating to payment and audit of claims (S. L. 1979, Ch. 541).

1983       New subsections were added to the Century Code concerning provisions for maintaining accounting records, provisions for funding of general and special expenditures, and procedures relating to deposits and disbursements of federal funding (S. L. 1983, Ch. 555).

1987       Legislation related to procedures of financial reporting (S. L. 1987, Ch. 646).

1999       Legislation related to monitoring tobacco product manufacturers settlement fund disbursements to a Community Health Trust Fund, the Common Schools Trust Fund, and the Water Development Trust Fund (S. L. 1999, Ch. 461

Office of Central Data Processing (1959)
[Authorized:  NDCC Chapter 54-44.2]

The Office of Central Data Processing was established as the central duplicating and data processing facility (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372). Centralization of the state's electronic data processing (EDP) systems first occurred in 1959 when the newly created Department of Accounts and Purchases assumed responsibility for maintenance of a central data processing facility for state government. The Office of Central Data Processing was established in 1969 (S. L. 1969, Ch. 454) with the Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases serving as ex-officio Director of Central Data Processing. The Office had responsibility for providing EDP services to state agencies through a centralized system of computer personnel, equipment, and services. The Director of Central Data Processing had authority to review EDP applications and the acquisition of EDP services and equipment by all agencies within the Executive Branch. Institutions under control of the State Board of Higher Education, Job Service North Dakota, and the office of the Adjutant General were exempt from control of EDP resources by the Director of Central Data Processing. In 1989 legislation concerned the redesignation of the office of Central Data Processing to an Information Services Division within the Office of the Management and Budget. The duties remained the same (S. L. 1989, Ch. 642). In 1999 appropriations for the Information Services Division created an Information Technology Department to replace the Information Services Division (S. L. 1999, Ch. 483). See: [NDCC 54-59] North Dakota Information Technology Department

CHRONOLOGY

1959       A centralization of electronic data processing systems (EDP) and central duplicating resources was required. Not included were the institutions under control of the State Board of Higher Education, Job Service North Dakota, and the office of the Adjutant General (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372).
                               
1967       Legislation provided appropriations for centralized data processing for use by state offices, agencies, or institutions (S. L. 1967, Ch. 392).

1969       Legislation established the Office of Central Data Processing within the Department of Accounts and Purchases. The legislation required the appointment of a Supervisor (S. L. 1969, Ch. 454).

1981       Legislation appropriated operating funds for the Central Data Processing (S. L. 1981, Ch. 538).

1987       The Century Code was amended regarding a Telecommunications Equipment and Supplies Fund as well as the provision of services for state departments and agencies (S. L. 1987, Ch. 562).

1989       Two new sections were added to the Century Code relating to the Capitol telephone exchange and wide area telephone service.  Also legislation concerned the redesignation of the office of Central Data Processing to an Information Services Division within the Office of the Management and Budget. The duties remained the same (S. L. 1989, Ch. 642).

1999       The appropriations for the Information Services Division related to legislation creating an Information Technology Department to replace the Information Services Division (S. L. 1999, Ch. 483).

Printing Division   (1959)
[Authorized:  NDCC Section 46-01-01]

Responsibility for state government publication activities was originally vested in the Commissioners of Public Printing created in 1890 (S. L. 1890, Ch. 119). Consisting of the Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and the State Auditor, the Commissioners of Public Printing were authorized to accept bids and award contracts for public printing. The Commissioners of Public Printing were replaced by the State Publication and Printing Commission in 1919 (S. L. 1919, Ch. 188). The State Publication and Printing Commission consisted of the Secretary of State, Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and the chairman of the Board of Railroad Commissioners. In addition to supervision of state printing the Commission was authorized to appoint a State Printer empowered to designate certain newspapers in the state as "official newspapers" for the publication of legal notices and court proceedings (S. L. 1919, Ch. 188). In 1959 the State Publication and Printing Commission was superseded by the Printing Division  (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372) within the Department of Accounts and Purchases and was assigned responsibility for all printing and binding for state government. The Office of Management and Budget Printing Division absorbed responsibility for providing printing, binding, and reproduction services for state agencies, purchasing and supervising all state government printing not done by the Printing Division, operating a central duplicating service for state agencies, and establishing guidelines on the proper form, style, and content of state publications. See: Office of Management and Budget, Central Services Division

CHRONOLOGY

1890       The Commissioners of Public Printing had responsibility for state government publications such as legislative journals and bills, government reports, and all other government forms and documents (S. L. 1890, Ch. 119).

1919       The Commissioners of Public Printing were replaced by the State Publication and Printing Commission and the Commission appointed a state printer who designated certain newspapers as “official” for the purpose of publishing state agency notices or proceedings (S. L. 1919, Ch. 188).

1959       The State Publication and Printing Commission was superseded by the Printing Division with responsibility for printing duties and authority for purchasing state supplies (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372). 
               
1981       Legislation appropriated operating funds for the State Printing Division (S. L. 1981, Ch. 538).

1999       Appropriations were allotted to Central Services formerly known as the Printing Division (S. L. 1999, Ch. 37).

Purchasing Division      (1959)

Centralized responsibility for providing supplies to state agencies began with creation of the Board of Trustees of Public Property in 1887 (T. L. 1887, Ch. 162). Consisting of the Governor, Territorial Secretary, and the Territorial Auditor, the Board of Trustees of Public Property provided all furniture, fuels, lights, stationery, postage, and other supplies for territorial and later, state offices. However the primary duty of the Board of Trustees of Public Property was maintenance of the Territorial/State Capitol and other properties. The Board of Trustees of Public Property was superseded by the Board of Control in 1911 (S. L. 1911, Ch. 62). Charged with management of state institutions the Board of Control only had authority to serve as the central purchasing agent for state institutions.

The Board of Administration was established in 1911 and had authority to serve as the purchasing agent for state government (Special Session, S. L. 1919, Ch. 47). In 1933 the Purchasing Agent was required to purchase goods for state institutions that met the standards of the US Bureau of Standards Specification (S. L. 1933, Ch. 244). The Purchasing Department was required to maintain an inventory of equipment and supplies for state departments and agencies (S. L. 1957, Ch. 214).

Authority for purchasing state supplies was transferred to the Department of Accounts and Purchases in 1959 (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372). Additionally the Century Code was amended concerning the powers and duties of the Director of Accounts and Purchases regarding the operation of a centralized purchasing service (S. L. 1969, Ch. 452) and also to the Office of Management and Budget in 1981 when authority for purchasing state supplies was transferred to the Office of Management and Budget. There were changes in powers and duties of the Centralized Purchasing Service such as contracting for and supervising the purchase or lease of supplies, furniture, fixtures, and other materials used by all Executive Branch agencies. In addition it had responsibility for classifying needed supplies and establishing written specifications and supply standards.  See: Office of Management and Budget, Central Services Division
                                                                                                                               
CHRONOLOGY

1887       Centralized responsibility for providing supplies to state agencies began with the creation of the Board of Trustees of Public Property (T.L. 1887, Ch. 162).  The Board was called this until 1911.

1911       The Board of Trustees of Public Property was superseded by the Board of Control (S. L. 1911, Ch. 62).

1919       Established in 1919 the Board of Administration had the authority to serve as the purchasing agent for state government (Special Session, S. L. 1919, Ch. 47).

1933       The Purchasing Agent was required to purchase goods for state institutions that met the standards of the US Bureau of Standards Specification (S. L. 1933, Ch. 244).

1957       The Purchasing Department was required to maintain an inventory of equipment and supplies for state departments and agencies (S. L. 1957, Ch. 214).

1959       The Department of Accounts and Purchases received the authority to become a centralized purchasing service (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372).

1967       Legislation related to the establishing of a Purchasing Agent and Purchasing Department Operating Fund (S. L. 1967, Ch. 392).

1969       The Century Code was amended concerning the powers and duties of the Director of Accounts and Purchases regarding the operation of a centralized purchasing service (S. L. 1969, Ch. 452).

1975       Legislation required a provision for an increase in working capital for the State Purchasing Department Operating Fund (S. L. 1975, Ch. 486). 

1979       Additional amendments were made to the State Purchasing Fund. 

1981       Authority for purchasing state supplies was transferred to the Office of Management and Budget and changes were made to the powers and duties of the Centralized Purchasing Service. Legislation appropriated operating funds for the State Purchasing Department (S. L. 1981, Ch. 538).

Central Personnel Division   (1975)
[Authorized:  NDCC Chapter 54-44.3]

A systematic management of the state's personnel resources began in 1957 with creation of the Merit System Council (S. L. 1957, Ch. 332) as a way to receive federal funding. This was followed by the creation of the Central Personnel Division within the Department of Accounts and Purchases in 1974 [Executive Order, 1974-3] to establish a uniform personnel system for state employees under control of the Executive Branch. The State Legislature established the State Personnel Board and the Central Personnel Division in 1975 (S. L. 1975, Ch. 487) and the Merit System Council was merged with the State Personnel Board in 1975 (S. L. 1975, Ch. 487) with the Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases appointing a Personnel Director who was chosen from among persons certified by the State Personnel Board (S. L.1974, Ch. 487).

In 1991 the Director of Central Personnel Division became the Merit System Council secretary serving in a non-voting capacity (S. L. 1991, Ch. 607) and in 1997 the North Dakota Merit System Council [NDCC 54-42] was repealed. However the State Personnel Board continued and consisted of a constitutionally elected official to serve as chairman, a member appointed by the Governor, a member appointed by the State Board of Higher Education, and two members elected by state employees included in the state classification system. The gubernatorial appointee and the elected members served six-year terms. The State Personnel Board was responsible for the establishment of a uniform system of personnel administration for employees in the state classification system, adoption of rules and personnel policies, and review of personnel actions affecting pay ranges, job classification, or disciplinary actions. The Board worked with the Director of the Central Personnel Division administering the central personnel system. The Director of the Central Personnel Division appointed by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget was to establish personnel rules subject to review by the State Personnel Board, implement the state employee job classification and pay plan, maintain a record of state employees and job classifications, and assist in employee training programs.

In 2003 the Director of the Office of Management and Budget appointed the Director of the Central Personnel System from among eligible persons certified by the State Personnel Board.  The System has had responsibility to serve as secretariat to the State Personnel Board, establish general policies, rules, and regulations relative to state employees, and establish and maintain classification and compensation plans. Other responsibility included the encouragement and assistance in the development of personnel administration within state agencies, including assisting in conducting employee training programs, assisting agencies in developing and implementing grievance procedures and providing a statewide appeal mechanism. Upon request the services have been offered to political subdivisions. The Legislative Assembly changed the name of the Central Personnel Division (S. L. 2003, Ch. 493) to the Office of Management and Budget, North Dakota Human Resources Management Services

CHRONOLOGY

1957       Systematic management of the state's personnel resources began in 1957 with creation of the Merit System Council (S. L. 1957, Ch. 332). 

1961       The Governor appointed a nine-member committee to recommend to the Governor executive or legislative action for the employment policies for the State of North Dakota by reviewing standard personnel policy guidelines [Executive Order, 1961-2].

1968       The State Advisory Personnel Appeal Board was created by the Governor who appointed seven state employees as members of the Board to conduct hearings and make formal recommendations to the agency or employee [Executive Order, 1968-43].

1973       Federal legislation required state personnel employed by certain state agencies to be under a merit system in order to obtain federal grants-in aid. This included mental health and retardation service units, human service centers, and other units resulting from combinations of mental health and retardation service units, area social service centers, and other functions of state agencies or departments. The federal law was under the direction of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly (S. L. 1973, Ch. 429). 

1974       The Central Personnel Division and the State Personnel Board were created within the Department of Accounts and Purchases [Executive Order, 1974-3] to establish a uniform personnel system for state employees under control of the Executive Branch. The Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases appointed the Personnel Director from among persons certified by the State Personnel Board (S. L.1974, Ch. 487). 

1975       The Merit System Council merged with the State Personnel Board and the Central Personnel Division. The Director of the Department of Accounts and Purchases served as Director of the Merit System Council (S. L. 1975, Ch. 487). The Legislature established permanently a Central Division of Personnel (S. L. 1975, Ch. 487).

1977       In the fall of 1977 a State Advisory Appeal Board was established to advise non-classification appeals (not covered by the merit system). The Board was composed of the appealing employee, a representative of the agency under question, and the Director of the Central Personnel Division who was a permanent member of the Board.

1979       There was an expansion of the Merit System in coverage to the agencies that were subject to the System (S. L. 1979, Ch. 568). 

1983       A State Personnel and Training Fund was established (S. L. 1983, Ch. 569).

1995       The Division of Risk Management was established in 1995 in response to the North Dakota Supreme Court decision to eliminate the state’s sovereign immunity for tort claims. The new Division included the director, administrative support, a claims management unit, workers compensation program, and loss control unit. Also in 1995 the administration of the Merit System was decentralized for those agencies required to have a merit system.

1997       The Director of the Central Personnel Division of the Office of Management and Budget was authorized to adopt rules contingent on the approval of the State Personnel Board thus providing compliance with state and federal law or rule governing state agencies under the merit system (S. L. 1997, Ch.461). The North Dakota Merit System Council [NDCC 54-42] was repealed. 

2003       The Legislative Assembly changed the name from the Central Personnel Division to the North Dakota Human Resources Management Services (S. L. 2003, Ch. 493).
 
Office of Intergovernmental Assistance    (1979)
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 54-44.5]

Statewide planning activities began with creation of the State Planning Board in 1935 (S. L. 1935, Ch. 217). The State Planning Board consisted of the State Geologist, head of the State School of Forestry, dean of the Division of Agriculture of the North Dakota Agricultural College, director of the College of Mining Engineering of the University of North Dakota, and six gubernatorial appointees serving staggered six-year terms. The functions of the State Planning Board were to research and formulate plans for the utilization and development of water, land, mineral, recreational, and economic resources of the state, make recommendations concerning rural land use, formulate plans for conservation of natural resources, promote public interest in state-wide planning, and cooperate with the federal government in administration of public works projects in North Dakota. The State Planning Board was repealed in 1939 (S. L. 1939, Ch. 203).

The Office of Intergovernmental Assistance has evolved over time to include the creation in 1963 of a State Planning Agency within the Economic Development Commission to advise and coordinate the planning activities of the state (S. L. 1963, Ch. 351). In 1967 the Governor authorized creation of a State Planning Coordinator [Executive Order, 1967-40] to coordinate all statewide planning activities. The Director of the State Planning Agency was required to report to the State Planning Coordinator. In 1969 a State Planning Division was created as part of the Department of Accounts and Purchases (S. L. 1969, Ch. 447) and assumed the duties of the State Planning Agency. The State Planning Division was added to the Department of Accounts and Purchases and the Governor appointed the Planning Director (S. L. 1969, Ch. 447). The Governor established the State Planning Advisory Council with members representing thirteen functional areas of state government for the purpose of advising and coordinating state planning needs and programs [Executive Order, 1971-52].  

In 1979 the State Planning Division and the Office of Energy Management [Executive Order, 1971-1] were combined to form the Federal Aid Coordinator Office (1979, Ch. 53). The Lieutenant Governor was designated as the Federal Aid Coordinator. The Federal Aid Coordinator Office was transferred to the Office of Management and Budget in 1981 (1981, Ch. 534) and the name was changed to the Office of Intergovernmental Assistance in 1983 (S. L. 1983, Ch. 570). The Director of the Office of Management and Budget could serve as the Federal Aid Coordinator or appoint a Coordinator to head the office which initially consisted of two Divisions: the State Planning Division and the Office of Energy Management and Conservation. The function of the State Planning Division to coordinate economic, social, and developmental planning activities of various local, county, regional, state, and federal planning agencies, act as the fiscal agent for planning agencies, maintain the State Planning Fund, and to receive and disseminate information on projects proposed for federal funding. The State Planning Division also had responsibility to review project applications (A95 review), provide financial and technical assistance to state and local planning agencies, assist public housing authorities, and assist in state land use planning.

In response in the 1973 Oil Embargo and the "energy crisis," Governor Arthur Link established an Office of Energy Management in 1974 [Executive Order, 1974-1] within the Governor's office to administer federal fuel allocation programs and an energy conservation program. The Office of Energy Management and Conservation assisted and coordinated energy activities and policy formation between all levels of the public and private sectors to conserve and encourage efficient use of energy resources. Also the Office of Energy Management and Conservation was to plan, develop, and implement energy conservation programs and encourage adoption of alternative energy technologies. In 1999 it (Intergovernmental Assistance) was named the Division of Community Services. In 2001 when the Department of Commerce was created (S. L. 2001, Ch. 488) it absorbed the Division of Community Services from the Office of Management and Budget.   See: [NDCC 54-60] Department of Commerce, Division of Community Services

CHRONOLOGY

1935       Statewide planning activities began with the creation of the State Planning Board consisting of the State Geologist, Head of the School of Forestry, Dean of the Agriculture of the North Dakota Agricultural College (NDSU), Director of the College of Mining Engineering at the University of North Dakota, and six citizen-representatives.  Also listed were the duties of the Board (S. L. 1935, Ch. 217).

1939       The State Planning Board was repealed in 1939 (S. L. 1939, Ch. 203).

1963       The State Planning Agency was placed within the Economic Development Commission (S. L. 1963, Ch. 351) until 1969.

1967       The Governor appointed a State Planning Coordinator and a Director of the State Planning Agency who reported to the Coordinator [Executive Order, 1967-40]. 

1969       The State Planning Division was added to the Department of Accounts and Purchases and the Governor appointed the Planning Director (S. L. 1969, Ch. 447).

1971       The Governor established the State Planning Advisory Council with members who represented thirteen functional areas of state government for the purpose of advising and coordinating state planning needs and programs [Executive Order, 1971-52].

1974       Legislation created the Office of Energy Management [Executive Order, 1974-1].

1977       Legislation created regional planning councils and repealed regional and metropolitan planning commissions.  The Planning Division of the Department of Accounts and Purchases coordinated planning efforts (S. L.1977, Ch. 495).

1979       The State Planning Division and the Office of Energy Management were combined to form the newly created Federal Aid Coordinator Office (S. L. 1979, Ch. 53).

1983       The Office of Intergovernmental Assistance was created (S. L. 1983, Ch. 570) from what was formerly the office of the Federal Aid Coordinator. The Director of the Office of Management and Budget could serve as the Federal Aid Coordinator or appoint a Coordinator to head the office.

1999       Intergovernmental Assistance became the Office of Management and Budget Division of Community Services.

2001 With the creation of the Department of Commerce (S. L. 2001, Ch. 488) the Division of Community Services (Intergovernmental Assistance) from the Office of Management and Budget was absorbed into Commerce.

Surplus Property Division      (1981)

The Superintendent of Public Instruction administered the state's Surplus Property Division from 1957 until 1981, when the division was incorporated in the Office of Management and Budget. The Surplus Property Division had responsibility for acquiring and maintaining surplus property from the state of North Dakota and the federal government for the purpose of "fair and equitable distribution" of state and federal surplus property by transfer to state agencies with a need for the property, sale to the highest bidder, or distribution to political subdivisions in the state.  See: Office of Management and Budget, Central Services Division

CHRONOLOGY

1957       The Superintendent of Public Instruction administered the Surplus Property Division.

1981       The duties of the Superintendent of Public Instruction who was administrator of the state's Surplus Property Division from 1957 until 1981was incorporated into the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1981, Ch. 537). 

1999       Additional requirements were set up for state department heads wanting to dispose of state property (S. L. 1999, Ch. 37).

2009       Legislation also concerned charges for recycling and disposal of surplus property (S. L. 2009, Ch. 507.)
 
Records Management Division     (1983)
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 54-46-03]

Legislation in 1959 (S. L. 1959, Ch. 36) authorized a records management study for review of state government records. The study revealed a need for a records management program and led to the passage of the Records Management Act in 1961 (S. L. 1961, Ch. 333). The Secretary of State was designated the State Records Administrator and had responsibility for establishing procedures for improving efficiency and economy in the management of records, coordination of the retention and disposition of state government records, establishing rules and regulations for retention and disposition of local government records, assisting in the establishment of records management programs in the legislative and judicial branches of state government, and surveying and making recommendations in the improvement of paperwork operations and better utilization of office space, equipment, and supplies. The law also required the head of each state agency to establish a records management program in their respective agencies.

In 1971, the State Legislature authorized a Central Microfilm Unit to provide microfilm services to state government. The State Records Administrator was responsible for supervision of the Central Microfilm Unit. The law which established the Central Microfilm Unit also allowed “micro photographic” copies of records to be admissible as evidence in court and to have the same weight or force as the original record. 

In 1983 the Secretary of State and the director of the Office of Management and Budget were given authority to transfer the Records Management Division and the Central Microfilm Unit to the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1983, Ch. 44). That legislation designated the Director of the Office of Management and Budget as the State Records Administrator. During the same session the State Legislature authorized a forms management program within the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1983, Ch. 571) to manage the creation and utilization of forms used by state government agencies. In 1991 legislation concerned the duties of the State Records Administrator and a repeal [NDCC 54-46.1-02.] relating to transfer of equipment from the Central Microfilm Unit. Also the confidentiality of records was addressed (S. L. 1991, Ch. 614). The Director of the Office of Management and Budget acted as the State Records Administrator.

In 1999 the appropriations for the Information Services Division within the Office of Management and Budget concerned legislation to create an Information Technology Department (ITD) to replace the Information Services Division (S. L. 1999, Ch. 483). The Records Management Division was moved to the newly created ITD with responsibility to implement and maintain records management, forms management, and micrographics programs in state agencies. The Division also worked with county record management. The Central Microfilm Unit falls within Records Management Division jurisdiction. In 2005 legislative changes related to the open records law as approved in 2003 (S. L. 2005, Ch. 15). See: [NDCC 54.59] Informational Technology Department, Records Management Division

CHRONOLOGY

1959       Legislation authorized a records management study for state government (S. L. 1959, Ch. 36).

1961       The request for a management study of state government revealed a need for a records management program and led to the passage of the Records Management Act (S. L. 1961, Ch. 333).

1963       All state agencies were to submit a biennial report to the Secretary of State (S. L. 1963, Ch. 346) and legislation required a uniform system for retaining and disposing of county records as prescribed by the Secretary of State (S. L. 1963, Ch. 354).

1965       At the request of the Legislative Rules Committee the Legislature passed a bill concerning the availability and confidentiality of state records from the Division of Vital Statistics.  It also concerned the disposal method for welfare records (S. L. 1965, Ch. 189).

1971       An amendment was passed concerning the disposal of state records and who in state government should be involved in the process. Additional criteria were established for disposal of records.  A section in the Century Code [NDCC 54-46-08] was repealed (S. L. 1971, Ch. 512) and legislation also provided for a Central Microfilm Unit under the authority of the Secretary of State (S. L. 1971, Ch. 513).

1973       The State Legislature passed legislation relating to the preservation of records that included involvement of the State Historical Society (S. L. 1973, Ch. 431).  

1977       Legislation related to the preservation of public records for the purpose of research, reference, or other uses in order to document governmental actions. Also addressed was the destruction of records by the Clerk of Court, records from counties, and city records. Additionally duties of state agency heads concerning the disposition or preservation of state records and the definition and destruction method of a “non-record” were established. Legislation also addressed a uniform system to manage county records, rules for the destruction of certain welfare records, and the disposal of township records (S. L. 1977, Ch. 502).

1981       The Legislature amended the Century Code as it related to the duties of the Central Microfilm Unit within the Office of the Secretary of State (S. L. 1981, Ch. 544).
                                                                                                                                               
1983       The Records Management Division was transferred from the Secretary of State to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and legislation was passed requiring a forms management program. The Secretary of State and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget were given authority to transfer the Records Management Division and the Central Microfilm Unit to the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1983, Ch. 44). The Director (or designee) of the Office of Management and Budget became the State Records Administrator.  During the same session the State Legislature authorized a forms management program within the Office of Management and Budget (S. L. 1983, Ch. 571) to manage the creation and utilization of forms used by state government agencies. Records Management was a division within the Office of Management and Budget until1990 when it was merged with the Information Services Division which is now Information Technology Department.

1985       Legislation gave responsibility for the Central Microfilm Unit to the State Records Administrator replacing the Secretary of State (S. L. 1985, Ch. 82).

1989       Legislation concerned procedures for records of cities and parks across the state of North Dakota (S. L. 1989, Ch. 293).

1991       Legislation related to the duties of the State Records Administrator and the repeal of the Century Code [NDCC 54-46.1-02.] concerning the transfer of equipment from the Central Microfilm Unit.  Also the confidentiality of records was addressed (S. L. 1991, Ch. 614). Additionally the use of optical disk storage [NDCC54-46.1-02.1] and processes relating to records management practices were addressed (S. L. 1991, Ch. 624).

1993       Legislation concerned the review of state records in relation to the retention and disposal of the records and added the State Auditor to the officials who were involved in the process of reviewing records. Others included the head of any state office, the Attorney General, and the State Archivist (S. L. 1993, Ch. 530). Legislation related to the records of state and county social services (S. L. 1993, Ch. 531).

1995       A new section was added to the Century Code [NDCC 37-03] concerning the biennial reports of state agencies (S. L. 1995, Ch. 350).
               
1999       The appropriations for the Information Services Division related to legislation creating an Information Technology Department to replace the Information Services Division (S. L. 1999, Ch. 483). Also amended was the Century Code concerning the provision of microfilm services by private contractor (S.L. 1999, Ch. 477). Legislation also adopted a uniform preservation records act for the preservation of business records and defined terms for business, a business record, and reproduction of a record. Procedures for the disposal of business records was addressed (S. L. 1999, Ch. 298).

2005       Additional changes related to the open records law as approved in 2003 (S. L. 2005, Ch. 15).

SERIES

31186 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Local and Regional A-95 Grant Review Files.
31187 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Environmental Impact Statements.
31188 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Anti-Ballistic Missile Site Impact Files.
31189 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Old West Regional Commission Files.
31190 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Industrial Development-State Opinion Survey Files.
31191 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Local and Regional Development Planning Council Files.
31192 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Audit Reports.
31199 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. State Plans and Studies.
31200 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Economic Development Coordinator’s Files.
31221 Central Personnel Division. North Dakota Merit System Council Minutes.
31222 Central Personnel Division. State Personnel Board Minutes and Correspondence.
31223 Central Personnel Division. Biennial Reports.
31224 Central Personnel Division. Rules and Regulations.
31225 Central Personnel Division. Job Specifications and Descriptions.
31226 Central Personnel Division. Consultant’s Reports.
31227 Central Personnel Division. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Reports.
31228 Central Personnel Division. Legislative Files.
31229 Central Personnel Division. Appeals Case Files.
31230 Central Personnel Division. Personnel Card Files.
31231 Surplus Property Division. Annual Reports.
31278 Office of the Budget. Administrative Files.
31331 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Federal Aid Coordinator’s Files.
31357 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Geothermal Grant Files.
31359 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. State Data Center Files.
31360 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Comprehensive Manpower Grant Files.
31361 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Local Government Community Communications Outreach Program Grant Files.
31362 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Emergency Shelter and Food Program Grant Files.
31363 Intergovernmental Assistance. Impact of the Reagan Economic Recovery Plan on North Dakota
31364 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Land Use Task Force Files.
31365 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Coal Impact Project Grant Files.
31366 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. State Planning Project Files (North Dakota Project 100).
31367 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Blueprint of City of Reile’s Acre.
31368 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Mid-American Solar Bank Complex Grant Files.
31369 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Housing Survey Reports.
31370 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Regional Economic Activity Reports.
31374 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. Futures Workshop Files.
31426 Office of Intergovernmental Assistance. State and Local Affairs Council Records.
31473 Central Personnel Division. Governor’s Personnel Policy Advisory Committee Minutes.
31475 Records Management Division. Recommended Reorganization Plan.
31478 Office of the Budget. State Agency Budget Files.
31498 Office of the Budget. State Agency Budget Requests.
31499 Office of the Budget. Budget Hearing Proceedings.
31500 Office of the Budget. State Budget Board Minutes.
31517 Office of the Budget. Regional and National Organizations Dues and Memberships Reports.
31518 Office of the Budget. State Board of Higher Education Uniform Accounting System.
31577 Intergovernmental Assistance. State Energy Conservation Plan Files.
31724 Intergovernmental Assistance. Energy Appropriate Technology Grant File.
31725 Intergovernmental Assistance. Federal Program Review System Records.
31728 Intergovernmental Assistance. Energy Supply and Consumption Summaries.
31748 Director of Institutions. Institutional Census Data Files.
31749 Director of Institutions. Administrative Files.
31750 Director of Institutions. Association for Retarded Citizens Lawsuit Files.
31751 Director of Institutions. News Releases.
31752 Director of Institutions. Correspondence Files.
31753 Director of Institutions. Court Case Files.
31772 Intergovernmental Assistance. Keep North Dakota Clean Photo Slides/Artwork.
31840 Records Management. Records Management Files.
31849 Intergovernmental Assistance. Capitol Maintenance Reference File.
31870 Intergovernmental Assistance. Files.
31878 Information Services Division. Directors Files.
31898 Intergovernmental Assistance. Oil Overcharge Fund Files.
31982 Fiscal Department. Administrative Files.
32010 Public Printing. Cost List.
32054 Facilities Management. Records, 1906-1995.
32069 Central Services Division. Newsletters and Publications.
32077 Director of Institutions. Employee Personnel Termination Cards.
32176 Facility Management. Drawings, Plans, and Maps of State Capitol, Capitol Grounds, State Owned Institutions.
32196 Facility Management. Organizational Charts.

SOURCES

Gray, David P, Guide to North Dakota State Archives, 1983.
Laws of Dakota Territory.
Legislative History of North Dakota State Agencies: Richard J. Wolfert State Librarian. State Library Commission, 1978.
North Dakota Century Code .
North Dakota Information Technology Department Website.
North Dakota Secretary of State Blue Book.
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.
Office of Management and Budget Website.

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